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Vincent Chevrier, Assistant Research Professor
Email: vchevrie@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-3170
Fax: (479) 575-7778
Vincent Chevrier, Assistant Research Professor

Dr. Vincent Chevrier is a Assistant Research Professor at the Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences.

His primary research interest include surface processes on Mars and icy bodies.

Dr. Vincent Chevrier
Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR  72701

Education
Ph.D., C.E.R.E.G.E in Aix-en-Provence, France, 2004
Maitrise in Earth Sciences, option Geophysics, University Paris VII, 1999-2000
Licence in Earth Sciences, University Paris VII, 1998-1999
DEUG (Diplome d'Etudes Universitaires Generales), option Geology, University Paris 1996-1998
Baccalaureat in Sciences, Academy of Versailles, France, 1996

Malcolm Cleaveland, Professor of Geology (Emeritus)
Email: mcleavel@uark.edu
Voice: (479)
Fax: (479)
Malcolm Cleaveland, Professor of Geology (Emeritus)

Dr. Malcolm Cleaveland is a Professor in the department of Geosciences at the University of Arkansas.  He teaches courses on Geograpraphic Information Systems: Intro to GIS; Tree-ring Applications to Environmental Research, Conservation of Natural Resources.

Dr. Cleaveland's interests include the origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres and examination of the great differences between the Earth, Venus and Mars as a way of determining what the most important influences are that shape planetary environments.  His primary research field is paleoclimatology and paleoclimatic reconstruction through high resolution proxies of climate, especially, in the case of the Earth, tree rings.

Education

Ph.D., University of Arizona, Geosciences, 1983
M.S., Clemson University, Forestry, 1975
B.S., Clemson University, Forestry, 1972, with high honors
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, Liberal Arts, 1963

Professional History

2000 to Present, Professor, Department of Geosciences
1996 to 1999, Associate Professor, Department of Geosciences
1990 to 1996, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography
1988 to 1990, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Geography
1984 to 1988, Research Associate, Department of Geography
1981 to 1984, Consultant (computer programming)
1978 to 1981, Botanist, U.S. Geological Survey, GS-7 and GS-9 (half time)
1974 to 1978, Graduate Associate in Research, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona X-Ray Densitometry of Tree Rings Project
1972 to 1974, Belle W. Baruch Fellow, Department of Forestry, Clemson University

Publications

Grissino-Mayer, H.D., P.R. Sheppard and M.K. Cleaveland. 2004. A dendroarchaeological ree-examination of the “Messiah” violin and other instruments attributed to Antonio Stradivari. J. Archaeological Sci. 31: 167-174.

Cleaveland, M.K., D.W. Stahle, M.D. Therrell, J. Villanueva-Diaz and B.T. Burns. 2003. Tree-ring reconstructed winter precipitation and tropical teleconnections in Durango, Mexico. Climatic Change 59: 369-388. 

Acuna-Soto, R., D.W. Stahle, M.K. Cleaveland and M.D. Therrell. 2002. Megadrought and megadeath in 16th century Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases 8: 360-362. 

Cleaveland, M.K. 2000. A 963-year reconstruction of summer (JJA) streamflow for the White River, Arkansas. The Holocene 10: 33-41.

Stahle, D.W., E.R. Cook, M.K. Cleaveland, M.D. Therrell, D.M. Meko, H.D. Grissino-Mayer, E. Watson and B.H. Luckman. 2000. Tree-ring data document 16th century megadrought over North America. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union 81: 121, 125.

Dan J. Davis, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Email: ddavis@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-5077
Fax: (479) 575-5049
Dan J. Davis, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Dan Davis is a Professor in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Arkansas with a particular interest in photosynthesis.  The process of photosynthesis provides the ultimate source of energy supporting life on this planet through the conversion of solar energy into biologically useful forms of chemical energy.

Dr. Danny Davis
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
418 Science and Engineering Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Davis' Web site

Education

Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1975

Professional History

1987, U of A Alumni Award for Teaching and Research
1975-1979, Research Associate, Indiana University

John Dixon, Professor of Geography
Email: jcdixon@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-3159
Fax: (479) 575-3846
John Dixon, Professor of Geography

Dr. John Dixon is a Professor of Geography in the Geosciences department at the University of Arkansas.  His space research interests concern the geomorphology of Mars - gullies formation and the assembly of a digital remotely sensed imaging library based on the collection of Harold McDonald, a former member of faculty in the Geology department at the University of Arkansas.  Other research projects are related to the physical geography of Arctic regions.  He currently has two projects underway.  One is in Swedish Lapland where he is looking at weathering and soil formation as it relates to potential climate change.  The other project deals with the development of whaling subsistence economies in the western Arctic of North America as related to environmental change over the past two millennia.

Dr. John Dixon
Department of Geosciences
113 Ozark Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Dixon's Web site

Education

Ph.D., Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder
M.A., University of Adelaide, South Australia
B.A., University of New South Wales

Professional History

2000-present, Professor, Department of Geosciences
1987-2000, Associate Professor
1981-1987, Assistant Professor
1993-1998, Chairman, Department of Geography
1996, Visiting Professor, University of Wollongong, Australia
1988, Visiting Professor, University of Adelaide, South Australia

Publications

Dixon, J.C., Scale in periglacial geomorphology.  Geomorphologie:  Relief, Processes, Environment.  Accepted

Thorn, C.E., Dixon, J.C., Darmody, R.G., and Allen, C.E., 2006.  Ten years (1994-2004) of 'potential' weathering at Karkevagge, Swedish Lapland.  Earth Surface Processes and Landforms,  31, 992-1002.

Thorn, C.E., Dixon, J.C., Darmody, R.G., and Allen, C.E., 2006.  A ten-year record of the weathering rates of surficial pebbles, Karkevagge, Swedish Lapland.  Catena, 65, 272-278.

Dixon, J.C., Campbell, S.W., Thorn, C.E., and Darmody, R.G. 2006.  Incipient weathering rind development on introduced machine-polished granite disks in an Arctic environment, northern Scandinavia.  Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 31, 111-121.

Dixon, J.C., and Thorn, C.E. 2005.  Chemical weathering and landscape development in mid-latitude alpine environments.  Geomorphology, 67, 127-145.

Po-Hao Adam Huang, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Email: phuang@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-4054
Fax: (479) 575-6982
Po-Hao Adam Huang, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Adam Huang is an Assistant Professor and AIAA Faculty Advisor in the department of Mechanical Engineering.  His research focuses on unsteady aerodynamics, pico/nano-satellites, and miniaturization sciences and technologies (MEMS/NEMS sensors and actuators).

Dr. Po-Hao Adam Huang
University of Arkansas
Department of Mechanical Engineering
204 Mechanical Enginnering Building
Fayetteville, AR  72701

Education

Ph.D., MEMS Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 2006
M.S., Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 2003
B.S., Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 1998

Publications

A. Madyala and A. Huang, “Characterization of 1st Generation High-Strain Elastomer MEMS Sensors for Morphing Aircraft Applications,” ASME IPACK2007-33871, Vancouver, Canada, July 8-12, 2007.

A. Huang, V.T.S. Wong, and C-M. Ho, “Silicone Polymer Chemical Vapor Sensors Fabricated by Direct Polymer Patterning On Substrate Technique (DPPOST),” Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, vol. 116, No. 1-2, pp. 2-10, July 2006.

A. Huang, V.T.S. Wong, and C-M. Ho, “Conductive Silicone Based MEMS Sensor and Actuator,” Proc. of the 13th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers’05), Seoul, Korea, June 5-9, 2005.

J. Lew, A. Huang, F. Jiang, Y-C. Tai, and C-M. Ho, “Surface Shear Stress Reduction with MEMS Sensors/Actuators in Turbulent Boundary Layers,” 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, AIAA-2004-424, Reno, Nevada, January 5-8, 2004.

A. Huang, J. Lew, Y. Xu, Y-C. Tai, and C-M. Ho, “Micro Sensors and Actuators for Macro Fluidic Control," IEEE Sensors Journal, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 494-502, August 2004.

Mack Ivey, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Email: mivey@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-2729
Fax: (479) 575-8434
Mack Ivey, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Dr. Mack Ivey is an Associate Professor in the department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas.  Research in his laboratory deals with the biochemical and genetic mechanisms by which bacteria respond to their ionic environment. One focus is on alkaliphilic Bacillus species, which grow at pH 10.5 or higher. These bacteria simultaneously maintain a large reversed pH gradient and high internal ATP concentrations via the actions of sodium/proton antiporters and an unusual ATP synthase. In Dr. Ivey's laboratory, molecular genetic and biochemical techniques are used to characterize these two enzymatic processes.  A second project involves the molecular characterization of ion transporters and other potential virulence determinants in the intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile.  Dr. Ivey and his colleagues are characterizing an unusual locus associated with peptide transport.  In addition, they have identified, cloned, and sequenced a novel Clostridial cycloserine resistance determinant.

Dr. Mack Ivey
Department of Biological Sciences
SCEN 627
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR  7270

Dr. Ivey's Lab Web site

Education

Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1987

Publications

Ivey, D.M., J. Zemsky, A. A. Guffanti, M. G. Sturr, D. B. Hicks, T. A. Krulwich, R. Gilmour, and M. Ito. 1998. Alkaliphile Bioenergetics, p. 181-210. In K. Horikoshi and W.D. Grant (eds.), Extremophiles: Microbial Life in Extreme Environments. Wiley-Liss, New York.

Das, A., D. M. Ivey, and L. G. Ljungdahl. 1997. Purification and reconstitution into proteoliposomes of the F1F0 ATP synthase from the obligately anaerobic gram-positive bacterium Clostridium thermoautotrophicum. J. Bacteriol. 179:1714-1720.

Ito, M., A. A. Guffanti, J. Zemsky, D. M. Ivey, and T. A. Krulwich. 1997. Role of the nhaCencoded Na+/H+ antiporter of alkaliphilic Bacillus firmus OF4. J. Bacteriol. 179:3851- 3857.

Ivey, D. M., M. G. Sturr, T. A. Krulwich, and D. B. Hicks. 1994. The abundance of atp gene transcript and of the membrane F1FO-ATPase as a function of the growth pH of alkaliphilic Bacillus firmus OF4. J. Bacteriol. 176:5167-5170.

Daniel Kennefick, Assistant Professor of Physics
Email: danielk@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-5916
Fax: (479) 575-4580
Daniel Kennefick, Assistant Professor of Physics

Dr. Daniel Kennefick is an Assistant Professor in the department of Physics at the University of Arkansas.  Dr. Kennefick's research falls in to two areas:  the physics of gravitational waves and their sources and the history and sociology of Modern Physics.  His physics research currently is focused on the modeling of gravitational waves from the inspiral of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes into supermassive black holes; such as probably exist in the centers of galaxies.  Dr. Kennefick is a member of the LISA International Science Team's Working Group 1.  LISA is a proposed NASA-ESA mission to fly a gravitational wave detector in space.  The group provided theoretical input to the mission's basic design parameters and mission specifications.  Dr. Kennefick is also an editor of the Einstein Papers Project, based at Caltech, engaged in the publication of the collected works of Albert Einstein and the analysis of Einstein's research papers from the 1920s and 1930s.  In recent years, he has conducted an extensive oral history and sociological study (over 100 interviews) of the field of gravitational wave physics.  This field is expected in the next 10 years to inaugurate a new field of "gravitational wave astronomy." 

Dr. Daniel Kennefick
Department of Physics
217 Physics Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

To visit the AGES web site, click here.

Education

Ph.D., Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1997
M.S., Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1991
M.Sc., Physics,  University College Cork, Ireland, 1989
B.Sc., Physics, 1st class honours, University College Cork, 1987 

Professional History

Jan 2004 – present, Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas and Editor, Einstein Papers Project, Princeton University Press
Jan 2001 – Jan 2004, Senior Research Fellow, California Institute of Technology
Aug 2000 – Dec 2000, Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas
Dec 1997 – Aug 2000, Research Associate, Cardiff University, Wales

Publications

“The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein Volume 9: The Berlin Years: Correspondence 1919-1920” – Robert Sculmann, József Illy, Daniel Kennefick, Tilman Sauer and Diana Kormos Buchwald, Editors – (Princeton University Press, 2004).

 “The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein Volume 7: The Berlin Years: Writings 1918-1921” – Michel Janssen, Robert Sculmann, József Illy, Christoph Lehner and Diana Kormos Buchwald, Editors – Daniel Kennefick and David Rowe, Associate Editors (Princeton University Press, 2001).

“Approximating the Inspiral of Test-Bodies into Kerr Black Holes” – K. Glampedakis, S. Hughes and D. Kennefick – Physical Review D 66, 064005 (2002).

“Gravitational Radiation Reaction of Eccentric Equatorial Orbits of Particles around Kerr Black Holes’’ –K. Glampedakis and D. Kennefick – Physical Review D 66, 044002 (2002).

“Star Crushing: Theoretical Controversy and the Theoreticians' Regress” – D. Kennefick – Social Studies of Science, 30/1, 5—40 (Feb 2000)

Julia Kennefick, Assistant Professor of Physics
Email: jkennef@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-5916
Fax: (479) 575-4580
Julia Kennefick, Assistant Professor of Physics

Dr. Julia Kennefick is an Assistant Professor in the department of Physics at the University of Arkansas.

Dr. Julia Kennefick
Department of Physics
217 Physics Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Kennefick's Web site

Education

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1996
B.S., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1989

Professional History

2007-present, Assistant Professor, Physics, University of Arkansas
2004-2007, NSF ADVANCE Fellow, Visiting Assistant Professor, Physics, University of Arkansas
2003-2004, Visiting Lecturer, Physics, University of Arkansas
1997-2000, Postdoctoral Researcher, NAPL, Oxford University
1995-1997, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University

Publications

“Infrared Imaging of SDSS Quasars: Implications for the Quasar K Correction”, Kennefick, J. & Bursick, S. 2008, Astronomical Journal, 136, 1799.

“Discovery of a Relationship Between Spiral Arm Morphology and Supermassive Black Hole Mass in Disk Galaxies", Seigar, M., Kennefick, D., Kennefick, J. & Lacy, C.H.S. 2008, Astrophysical Journal Letters, 678, 93.

“The BTC40 Survey for Quasars at 4.8 < z < 6”, Monier, E., Kennefick, J.D., Osmer, P.S., Hall, P.B., Smith, M.G., Dalton, G.B., and Green, R.F. 2002, Astron. J., 124, 2971.

“Quasar Candidates in the Hubble Deep Field”, Conti, A., Kennefick, J.D., Martini, P., and Osmer, P.S. 1999, Astron. J., 117, 645.


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Timothy Kral, Associate Professor of Biology
Email: tkral@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-6338
Fax: (479) 575-4010
Timothy Kral, Associate Professor of Biology

Dr. Tim Kral is an Associate Professor of Microbiology in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas.  Since 1992 he has been collaborating with Dr. Chris McKay of NASA Ames Research Center working with methanogenic microorganisms as possible life forms existing below the surface of Mars.  His areas of research interest include streptococcal physiology and genetics, antibiotic and fluoride sensitivity and resistance, and space biology.  Current research projects in his laboratory include analysis of the genetic and physiological bases of fluoride resistance in oral streptococci, nature of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, as well as a NASA project examining the survivability of certain bacterial species under conditions mimicking those on Mars.  Dr. Kral has mentored six graduate and 25 undergraduate students on space-related research projects.  Of these 31 students, 15 were female and two were minority.  He will continue to mentor students and participate in teaching graduate-level courses in the program.  Dr. Krall has been an invited speaker at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in 2001 and the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in 2000.  He has also done numerous presentations on space-related research at the American Society for Microbiology annual meetings (1995-2001) and the International Society for the Study of Origins of Life meeting in 1999.

Dr. Tim Kral
Department of Biological Sciences
624 Science Engineering
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Kral's Web site

Education

Ph.D., Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, 1978
B.S., Biology, John Carroll University, Cleveland, Ohio, 1973

Professional History

1988-present, Associate Professor, Microbiology, University of Arkansas
1981-1988, Assistant Professor, Microbiology, University of Arkansas
Postdoctoral Research, Microbiology, Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia

Publications

Sears D. W. G., Benoit P. H., McKeever S. W. S., Banerjee D., Kral T., Stites W., Roe L., Jansma P. and Mattioli G. (2002) Investigation of biological, chemical and physical processes on and in planetary surfaces by laboratory simulation. Planet. Space Sci. (in press).

Sears D.W.G., Stites W.E., Kral T., Roe L., Benoit P.H., McKeever S.W.S., Lepper K., Kochan H., and Huebner W. (2000) Andromeda: A large environmental chamber for planetary science research. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXI, CD-ROM #1464.

Sears D. W. G. and Kral T. A. (1998). SEM imaging of martian and lunar meteorites and implications for microfossils in martian meteorites. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXIX, CD-ROM, #1934

Kral, T.A., K.M. Brink, S.M. Miller, and C.P. McKay. (1998). Hydrogen Consumption by Methanogens on the Early Earth. Origins Life Evol. Biosphere. 28, 311-319

Sears, D.W.G. and T.A. Kral. 1998. Martian microfossils in Lunar Meteorites? Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 33, 791-794


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Claud Lacy, Professor of Physics, Chairman of Astronomy Program
Email: clacy@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-5928
Fax: (479) 575-4580
Claud Lacy, Professor of Physics, Chairman of Astronomy Program

Dr. Claud Lacy is a Professor in the department of Physics at the University of Arkansas.  His current research centers on the theory of stellar evolution, especially on methods of testing the validity of its details.  He is part of an international collaboration to determine accurate fundamental astrophysical data about stars in eclipsing binary and multiple star systems.  The collaborations efforts are directed to the task of testing their current theories at the highest levels of accuracy attainable.

Dr. Claud Lacy
Department of Physics
206 Physics Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Lacy's Web site

Education

University of Oklahoma, 1969, BS (Physics), BS (Astronomy), MS (Physics)
University of Texas at Austin, 1978, Ph.D. (Astronomy)

Professional History

1999-present, Professor, University of Arkansas
1986-1999, Associate Professor, University of Arkansas
1980-1986, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas
1978-1980, Texas A&M University, Visiting Assistant Professor

Publications

Absolute Properties of RT Corona Borealis, (with J.A. Sabby), Astron. J., submitted (2002).

Photometry of Selected Eclipsing Binary Stars, Astron. J., 124, 1162 (2002).

Times of Minima of Eclipsing Binaries, (with A. Straughn & F. Denger), I.B.V.S., No. 5251 (2002).

Absolute Properties of the Main-Sequence Eclipsing Binary Star WW Camelopardalis,” (with G. Torres, A. Claret, & J.A. Sabby), Astron. J., 123, 1013 (2002).

The Period of LV Herculis Revisited, (with G. Torres, Guilbault, P.R., Diethelm, R., Baldwin, M.E., & Lubcke, G.C.), I.B.V.S., No. 5201 (2001).


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Alan Mantooth, Professor of Electrical Engineering
Email: mantooth@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-4838
Fax: (479) 575-7967
Alan Mantooth, Professor of Electrical Engineering

Dr. Alan Mantooth is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering department at the University of Arkansas.  His current research includes mixed-signal circuit and system design, as well as modeling semiconductor devices, analog circuits and systems, mixed-signal circuits and systems, and mixed-technology systems (electro-thermal and electro-mechanical).  He is also interested in CAD tools for modeling and design of the above areas.

Dr. Alan Mantooth
Department Electrical Engineering
3217 Bell Engineering Center
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Mantooth's Web site

Education

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Techonology, 1990
M.S.E.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1987
B.S.E.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1985

Professional History

2002-present, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas
1998-2002, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
1998, Principal Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1995-1998, Principal Investigator, Simulation Productivity R & D, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1994-1996, Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle
1994-1995, Corporate Staff Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1993-1994, Project Leader of Model Development, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1990-1993, Senior Modeling Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1989, Component Modeling Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon


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Larry Roe, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Email: lar@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-3750
Fax: (479) 575-6982
Larry Roe, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Larry Roe is an Associate Professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Combustion Research Lab, with specific expertise in propulsion, reacting flows, and associated instrumentation.  His areas of research interest include gas turbine combustion, ramjet and scramjet combustion processes, non-conventional liquid fuel sprays, electrical aspects of combustion, and gas generation for inflatable structures.  He is a founding co-I of the Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, serves as Chairman of the Deployment Subcommittee of the AIAA Working Group on Gossamer and Inflatable Structures for Space Applications, and served as an Associate Editor of the recently released Gossamer Spacecraft: Membrane and Inflatable Structures Technology for Space Applications.  He has received Summer Faculty Fellowships to work four summers with the Advanced Propulsion Division of Wright Labs, and two summers with the Advanced Propulsion Group of JPL, and did the conceptual design of the reaction-based inflation system for the 25-meter-diameter antenna for the proposed ARISE radio astronomy spacecraft. Dr. Roe will mentor and teach graduate-level courses to students in the program.

Dr. Larry Roe
Department of  Mechanical Engineering
204D Mechanical Engineering Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Roe's Web site

Education
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida, 1987
M.S., Engineering Science, University of Mississippi, 1976
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, University of Mississippi, 1971

Professional History
2000-present, Associate Professor, University of Arkansas
1994-2000, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas
1987-1994, Assistant Professor, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
1984-1985, Contract Engineer, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, W. Palm Beach, FL
1976-1980, Senior Analytical Engineer, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, W. Palm Beach, FL
1971-1973, Associate Engineer, Westinghouse Research Labs, Pittsburgh, PA

Publications

Macfarlan, K. H.,  and L. A. Roe, “Prediction and Measurement of Spatially Distributed NO Levels in Lean Premixed Combustion," AIAA Paper 2005-4870, 17th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, Toronto, June 6-9, 2005.

Buffington, J. A., M. A. Franzen, S. Azouggagh-McBride, L. A. Roe, and D. W. G. Sears, "Simulation of Extraterrestrial Sample Acquisition," 36th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, #1452, Houston, March 14-18, 2005.

Azouggagh-McBride, S., L. A. Roe, M. A. Franzen, J. A. Buffington, and D. W. G. Sears, "Simulation of Recovery Impacts for the Prototype Hera Asteroid Sample Collector," 36th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, #1464, Houston, March 14-18, 2005.

Franzen, M. A., L. A. Roe, J. A. Buffington, and D. W. G. Sears, "Sample Collection from Small Airless Bodies: Examination of Temperature Constraints for the TGIP Sample Collector for the Hera Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return Mission," 36th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, #1467, Houston, March 14-18, 2005.

Sears, Derek, Larry Roe, and Shauntae Moore, "Stability of Water and Gully Formation on Mars," 36th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, #1496, Houston, March 14-18, 2005.


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Derek Sears, University Professor, W. M. Keck Professor of Space and Planetary Sciences
Email: dsears@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-4272
Fax: (479) 575-7778
Derek Sears, University Professor, W. M. Keck Professor of Space and Planetary Sciences

Dr. Derek Sears is a University Professor in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Arkansas.  He is head of the Cosmochemistry Research Group.  His areas of research interest include laboratory studies of extraterrestrial materials, stability of water on Mars, asteroid and comet surface processes, history of meteoritics, chemical and physical studies of chondrites, and chondrule formation.

Dr. Derek Sears
Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences
202 Old Museum Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Sears' Research (Cosmochemistry Group) site link
Dr. Sears' Teaching (Department and Center) site link
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry site link
W. M. Keck Laboratory for Space Simulation site link
Dr. Sears' personal site link

Education

Ph.D., Astronomy/Geology, University of Leicester, UK, 1974
UK Diploma Space Science, University of London (University College), 1971
B.S., Chemistry, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK, B.Sc. (Honors), 1970

Professional History

2005-present, University Professor, W. M. Keck Professor of Space and Planetary Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas
1988-2005, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas
1984-1988, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas

Sabbatical Leave/Visiting Positions

1987, Senior Research Associate, Open University, U.K.
1979-1981, Assistant Research Chemist, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (Advisor: Dr. J. T. Wasson)
1977-1979, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Univ. of Birmingham, UK, Dept. of Physics
1974-1977, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Univ. of Manchester, UK, Dept. of Metallurgy

Publications

Bryson, K., Chevrier, V., Sears, D. (2007)  The Effect of a Fine-Grained Basaltic Layer on the Evaporation of Ice Under Martian Conditions, 38th Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, March 12-17, 2007, in League City, Texas, abstract no. 1246.

Chittenden, J., Sears, D., Chevrier, V. (2007)  Effect of Wind on the Stability of Water Ice Under Martian Conditions, 38th Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, March 12-17, in League City, Texas, abstract no. 1253.

Craig, J., Sedaghatpour, F., Gucsik, A., Sears, D. (2007)  Fragments of Separated Opaque Matrix From the Semarkona Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrite, 38th Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, March 12-17, in League City, Texas, abstract no. 1095.

Denson, J., Ivey, M., Sears, D., Gucsik, A., Videki, R. (2007)  Catholuminescence and its Application for Biosignature Analysis of Mn-Containing Biogenic Minerals;  A Review, 38th Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, in League City, Texas, abstract no. 1009.

Ostrowski, D., Chevrier, V., Chastain, B., Sears, D. (2007)  Experimental Study of the Water Vapor Interaction with Clay Regolith During Ice Sublimation on Mars, 38th Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, March 12-17, in League City, Texas, abstract no. 2097


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Marc Seigar, Adjunct Professor
Email: mxseigar@ualr.edu
Voice: (479)
Fax: (479)
Marc Seigar, Adjunct Professor

Dr. Marc Seigar is an Assistant Professor in the department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Arkansas Little Rock.  He is an astronomer specializing in the structure, morphology and dynamics of galaxies and their dark matter halos. He is involved in three major projects. The first of these is the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), a collaborative effort, which involves all the astronomers in the Space Center, and is currently focussed on conducting a census ofsupermassive black holes in the Universe. He is also involved in the Carnegie-Irvine Nearby Galaxies Survey (CINGS) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

Dr. Marc Seigar
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Department of Physics & Astronomy
2801 S. University Avenue
Little Rock, AR  72204
Tel: (501) 569-8964
Fax: (501) 569-3314

Dr. Seigar's Web site
AGES Web site link

Education

Ph.D. in Astrophysics, Liverpool John Moores University, 1998
M.S. in Radio Astronomy, University of Manchester, 1994
B.S. in Physics, Imperial College, 1993

Professional History

2007-present, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2004-2007, Assistant Project Scientist, University of California, Irvine
2001-2004, UKIRT Support Astronomer, Joint Astronomy Centre
1998-2001, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Ghent University, Belgium

Publications

For a list of Dr. Seigar's publications, please visit his Web site.


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Fang-Zhen Teng, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Email: fteng@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-4524
Fax: (479) 575-3469
Fang-Zhen Teng, Assistant Professor of Geosciences

Dr. Fang-Zhen Teng is an Assistant Professor in the department of Geosciences.  His research concerns the composition, formation and evolution of the Earth and early solar system by using stable (Li, Mg and Fe) and short-lived (26Al) isotopic systematics measured by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS).

Dr. Fang-Zhen Teng
Isotope Laboratory, Department of Geosciences
113 Ozark Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR  72701

Dr. Teng's Web site

Education

Ph.D., Geochemistry, University of Maryland, 2005
B.S., Geochemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, 2001

Professional History

01/2008-present, Assistant Professor, Department of Geosciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
11/2006-12/2007, Post-doctoral Research Associate, Department of Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago
06/2006-10/2006, Post-doctoral Research Associate, Department of Geology, The Field Museum of Natural History
02/2006-05/2006, Post-doctoral Research Associate, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park
09/2001-12/2005, Research Assistant, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park

Publications

Teng, F.-Z., McDonough, W. F., Rudnick, R. L., Dalpé, C., Tomascak, P. B., Chappell, B. W. and Gao, S. (2004) Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the upper continental crust, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 68(20), 4167-4178.

Teng, F.-Z., McDonough, W. F., Rudnick, R. L. and Walker, R. J. (2006) Diffusion-driven extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in country rocks of the Tin Mountain pegmatite. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 243 (3-4), 701-710.

Teng, F.-Z., McDonough, W. F., Rudnick, R. L., Walker, R. J. and Sirbescu, M.-L. C. (2006) Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota. American Mineralogist, 91, 1488-1498.

Teng, F.-Z., McDonough, W. F., Rudnick, R. L. and Wing, B. A. (2007) Limited lithium isotopic fractionation during progressive metamorphic dehydration in metapelites: A case study from the Onawa contact aureole, Maine. Chemical Geology, 239, 1-12.

Teng, F.-Z., Wadhwa, M., and Helz R. T. (2007) Investigation of magnesium isotope fractionation during basalt differentiation: Implications for a chondritic composition of the terrestrial mantle, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 261 (1-2), 84-92.


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Jason Tullis, Assistant Professor of Geography
Email: jatullis@uark.edu
Voice: (479) 575-4770
Fax: (479) 575-3649
Jason Tullis, Assistant Professor of Geography

Dr. Jason A. Tullis is an Assistant Professor of Geography specializing in remote sensing and GIScience at University of Arkansas; he is a member of the Department of Geosciences and is affiliated with the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST); his research interests focus on remote sensing-assisted decision support in North and Central American biogeography and functional landscape health; Dr. Tullis’ research addresses three overlapping areas within this domain, including 1) management of spatial scale, 2) integration of multi-source remote sensor, in situ, and ancillary data, and 3) forest biophysical remote sensing.

Dr. Jason A. Tullis
Department of Geosciences
113 Ozark Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Dr. Tullis' Vitae

Education

Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 2003
M.S., University of South Carolina, 2001
B.S., Brigham Young University, 1999

Professional History

2004-present, Assistant Professor, Geosciences, Univ. of Arkansas
2001-2004, NASA ARC Program Manager, Geography, Univ. of South Carolina
1999-2003, RA, TA, and Instructor, Geography, Univ. of South Carolina

Publications

Tullis, J.A. and J.R. Jensen, 2003, “Expert System House Detection in High Spatial Resolution Imagery Using Size, Shape, and Context”, Geocarto International 18(1):5-15.

Raber, G.T., J.R. Jensen, M.E. Hodgson, J.A. Tullis, B.A. Davis and J. Berglund, 2007, “Impact of Lidar Nominal Post-spacing on DEM Accuracy and Flood Zone Delineation”, Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 73(7):793-804.

Tullis, J.A., J.D. Cothren, D.E. Irwin, C. Yeager, W.F. Limp, J.M. Wilson, B.E. Gorham and S. Ogle, 2007, “Yearly Extraction of Central America’s Land Cover for Carbon Flux Monitoring”, GIScience and Remote Sensing 44(3):220-236.

Im, J., J.R. Jensen and J.A. Tullis, 2008, “Object-based Change Detection Using Correlation Image Analysis and Image Segmentation Techniques”, International Journal of Remote Sensing 29(2):399-423.

Tullis, J.A. and J.M. Defibaugh y Chávez, 2008, “Scale Management and Remote Sensor Synergy in Forest Monitoring”, Geography Compass, in press.


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Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences
Stone House North, room F50
346 ½ N. Arkansas Ave.
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
csaps@uark.edu
Tel. 479-575-7625 Fax. 479-575-7778