Faculty

Mohamed Aly, Assistant Professor of Geosciences

Dr. Mohamed Aly

Department of Geosciences
319 JB Junt
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: aly@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-4524

Dr. Mohamed Aly is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geosciences and affiliate faculty with the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST), the Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, and the Environmental Dynamics (ENDY) Program at the University of Arkansas. Dr. Aly’s research interests include Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR), digital image processing, Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), crustal deformation modeling, and geohazard assessment. As a geoscientist, he integrates geospatial technologies to assess, monitor, and model geothermal processes and geohazards such as active volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, and ground subsidence. Dr. Aly is a principal investigator and co-investigator on proposals sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Space Agency (DLR), and the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA). He teaches radar remote sensing, GIS analysis and modeling, natural hazards, and general geology courses. In addition, he has a distinguished record of service and contribution to both the professional and the local communities for many years.


Michael Ceballos, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Dr. Michael Ceballos

Department of Biological Sciences
Science and Engineering Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: ceballos@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-5643

Education

Ph.D., University of Montana (Missoula), Microbiology and Biochemistry


Vincent Chevrier, Assistant Research Professor

Dr. Vincent Chevrier

Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences
F47 Stone House North
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: vchevrie@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-3170

Fax: (479)575-7778

Dr. Chevrier is an Assistant Research Professor at the Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences. His primary research interest include surface processes on Mars and icy bodies.

Education

Ph.D., C.E.R.E.G.E in Aix-en-Provence, France, 2004
Maitrise in Earth Sciences, option Geophysics, University Paris VII, 1999 - 2000
Licence in Earth Sciences, University Paris VII, 1998 - 1999
Diplome d'Etudes Universitaires Generales, option Geology, University Paris, 1996 - 1998
Baccalaureat in Sciences, Academy of Versailles, France, 1996


John Dixon, Emeritus Professor of Geosciences

Dr. John Dixon

Department of Geosciences
113 Ozark Ha
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: jcdixon@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-3159

Fax: (479)575-3846

Dr. Dixon is a Professor of Geography in the Geosciences department at the University of Arkansas. His space research interests concern the geomorphology of Mars - gullies formation and the assembly of a digital remotely sensed imaging library based on the collection of Harold McDonald, a former member of faculty in the Geology department at the University of Arkansas. Other research projects are related to the physical geography of Arctic regions. He currently has two projects underway. One is in Swedish Lapland where he is looking at weathering and soil formation as it relates to potential climate change. The other project deals with the development of whaling subsistence economies in the western Arctic of North America as related to environmental change over the past two millennia.

Education

Ph.D., Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder
M.A., University of Adelaide, South Australia
B.A., University of New South Wales

Professional History

2000 - present: Professor, Department of Geosciences
1987 - 2000: Associate Professor
1981 - 1987: Assistant Professor
1993 - 1998: Chairman, Department of Geography
1996: Visiting Professor, University of Wollongong, Australia
1988: Visiting Professor, University of Adelaide, South Australia


Walter Graupner, Laboratory Manager

Walter Graupner

W. M. Keck Laboratory
Daniel E. Ferritor Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: wgraupn@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-3170

Mr. Graupner works with faculty and students to develop our labs and facilities, to provide assistance in resource availability and lab compliance involving safety and environmental protection. He was awarded the U of A Staff Employee of the year for the 2006/2007 school year.

“I come from a background where my Grandfather taught me to be independent. He had a 6th grade education and worked into a position building bulk facilities for Standard Oil, later Exxon. Grandpa showed me that most ideas can be accomplished with imagination, creativity and the right tools.”

Hobbies include almost anything on water, especially sailing.

Education

B.S., Agriculture, University of Arkansas

Work Experience

Military and commercial aviation electronics, toxicology and physiology research development, poultry equipment design and development.
Raising cattle, small fruit and edible mushroom production on a small farm in West Fork.


Po-Hao Adam Huang, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Po-Hao Adam Huang

Department of Mechanical Engineering
204 Mechanical Enginnering Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: phuang@uark.edu@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-4054

Fax: (479)575-6982

Dr. Huang is an Assistant Professor and AIAA Faculty Advisor in the department of Mechanical Engineering.  His research focuses on unsteady aerodynamics, pico/nano-satellites, and miniaturization sciences and technologies (MEMS/NEMS sensors and actuators)

Education

Ph.D., MEMS Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 2006
M.S., Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 2003
B.S., Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 1998


Mack Ivey, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Dr. Mack Ivey

Department of Biological Sciences
627 Science and Engineering Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: mivey@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-2729

Fax: (479)575-8434

Dr. Ivey is an Associate Professor in the department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas. Research in his laboratory deals with the biochemical and genetic mechanisms by which bacteria respond to their ionic environment. One focus is on alkaliphilic Bacillus species, which grow at pH 10.5 or higher. These bacteria simultaneously maintain a large reversed pH gradient and high internal ATP concentrations via the actions of sodium/proton antiporters and an unusual ATP synthase. In Dr. Ivey's laboratory, molecular genetic and biochemical techniques are used to characterize these two enzymatic processes. A second project involves the molecular characterization of ion transporters and other potential virulence determinants in the intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile. Dr. Ivey and his colleagues are characterizing an unusual locus associated with peptide transport. In addition, they have identified, cloned, and sequenced a novel Clostridial cycloserine resistance determinant.

Education

Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1987


Daniel Kennefick, Associate Professor of Physics

Dr. Daniel Kennefick

Department of Physics
217 Physics Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: danielk@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-5916

Fax: (479)575-4580

Dr. Daniel Kennefick is an Assistant Professor in the department of Physics at the University of Arkansas. Dr. Kennefick's research falls in to two areas: the physics of gravitational waves and their sources and the history and sociology of Modern Physics. His physics research currently is focused on the modeling of gravitational waves from the inspiral of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes into supermassive black holes; such as probably exist in the centers of galaxies. Dr. Kennefick is a member of the LISA International Science Team's Working Group 1. LISA is a proposed NASA-ESA mission to fly a gravitational wave detector in space. The group provided theoretical input to the mission's basic design parameters and mission specifications. Dr. Kennefick is also an editor of the Einstein Papers Project, based at Caltech, engaged in the publication of the collected works of Albert Einstein and the analysis of Einstein's research papers from the 1920s and 1930s. In recent years, he has conducted an extensive oral history and sociological study (over 100 interviews) of the field of gravitational wave physics. This field is expected in the next 10 years to inaugurate a new field of "gravitational wave astronomy."

Education

Ph.D., Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1997
M.S., Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1991
M.Sc., Physics, University College Cork, Ireland, 1989
B.Sc., Physics, 1st class honours, University College Cork, 1987

Professional History

Jan 2004 – present: Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas and Editor, Einstein Papers Project, Princeton University Press
Jan 2001 – Jan 2004: Senior Research Fellow, California Institute of Technology
Aug 2000 – Dec 2000: Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas
Dec 1997 – Aug 2000: Research Associate, Cardiff University, Wales


Julia Kennefick, Associate Professor of Physics

Dr. Julia Kennefick

Department of Physics
217 Physics Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: jkennef@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-5916

Fax: (479)575-4580

Dr. Julia Kennefick is an Assistant Professor in the department of Physics at the University of Arkansas.

Education

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1996
B.S., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1989

Professional History

2007-present: Assistant Professor, Physics, University of Arkansas
2004-2007: NSF ADVANCE Fellow, Visiting Assistant Professor, Physics, University of Arkansas
2003-2004: Visiting Lecturer, Physics, University of Arkansas
1997-2000: Postdoctoral Researcher, NAPL, Oxford University
1995-1997: Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University


Timothy Kral, Professor of Biology

Dr. Tim Kral

Department of Biological Sciences

University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: tkral@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-6338

Fax: (479)575-4010

Dr. Kral is an Associate Professor of Microbiology in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas. Since 1992 he has been collaborating with Dr. Chris McKay of NASA Ames Research Center working with methanogenic microorganisms as possible life forms existing below the surface of Mars. His areas of research interest include streptococcal physiology and genetics, antibiotic and fluoride sensitivity and resistance, and space biology. Current research projects in his laboratory include analysis of the genetic and physiological bases of fluoride resistance in oral streptococci, nature of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, as well as a NASA project examining the survivability of certain bacterial species under conditions mimicking those on Mars. Dr. Kral has mentored six graduate and 25 undergraduate students on space-related research projects. Of these 31 students, 15 were female and two were minority. He will continue to mentor students and participate in teaching graduate-level courses in the program. Dr. Krall has been an invited speaker at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in 2001 and the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in 2000. He has also done numerous presentations on space-related research at the American Society for Microbiology annual meetings (1995-2001) and the International Society for the Study of Origins of Life meeting in 1999.

Education

Ph.D., Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, 1978
B.S., Biology, John Carroll University, Cleveland, Ohio, 1973


Professional History

1988 - present: Associate Professor, Microbiology, University of Arkansas
1981 - 1988: Assistant Professor, Microbiology, University of Arkansas
Postdoctoral Research, Microbiology, Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia


Pradeep Kumar, Assistant Professor of Physics

Dr. Pradeep Kumar

Physics Department
Physics
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: pradeepk@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-2408

Dr. Kumar is an Assistant Professor in the Physics Department at the University of Arkansas. Kumar’s research lab at the U of A lab combines experiments, modeling and theory to understand adaptive evolution of living systems to the extremes of physical and chemical conditions such as temperature and pressure, among other things.


Bret Lehmer, Assistant Professor of Physics

Dr. Bret Lehmer

Physics Department
206 Physics
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701


Email: lehmer@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-5928

Dr. Lehmer is an Assistant Professor in the Physics Department at the University of Arkansas. Dr. Lehmer's research interests include extragalactic multi-wavelength surveys of normal and active galaxies; the formation and evolution of X-ray binary and compact object populations in galaxies; and the coevolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes. He is focused on constructing a comprehensive picture for how and why the X-ray emission from galaxies has changed throughout the history of the Universe.

Education

Ph.D., Penn State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 2007
B.S., University of Iowa, Department of Physics, 2002

Professional History

2015-present Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas, USA
2012-2015 Research Associate, Johns Hopkins/Goddard, USA
2009-2012 Einstein Fellow, Johns Hopkins/Goddard, USA
2007-2009 Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Fellow, Durham, UK


Dan Lessner, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Dr. Dan Lessner

Department of Biological Sciences
628 Science and Engineering Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: dlessner@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-2239

Fax: (479)575-4010

Dr. Lessner is an Associate Professor in the department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas. Dr. Lessner's research is focused on the physiology, genetics and biochemistry of the strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens). Current research projects are focused on understanding factors involved in the oxidative stress response of methanogens, using Methanosarcina acetivornas as a model. Several projects involve proteins that function in iron-sulfur cluster binding, biogenesis, and repair. One project currently funded by NASA and NSF is focused on understanding the role of iron-sulfur cluster in RNA polymerase, the enzyme that carries out transcription in all cells. A second project is focused on elucidating the function of thioredoxins (disulfide oxidoreductases) in methanogens, and is currently funded by the Arkansas Biosciences Institute. A third project is focused on identifying proteins involved in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in methanogens. Results from these projects have implications in understanding the origins and evolution of life.

Education

Ph.D., University of Iowa, 2003
B.S., University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, 1996


Professional History

2014 - present: Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas
2008 - 2014: Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas
2003 - 2008: Postdoctoral Fellow, Pennsylvania State University


Alan Mantooth, Professor of Electrical Engineering

Dr. Alan Mantooth

Department of Electrical Engineering
3217 Bell Engineering Center
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701


Email: mantooth@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-4838

Fax: (479)575-7967

Dr. Mantooth is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering department at the University of Arkansas. His current research includes mixed-signal circuit and system design, as well as modeling semiconductor devices, analog circuits and systems, mixed-signal circuits and systems, and mixed-technology systems (electro-thermal and electro-mechanical). He is also interested in CAD tools for modeling and design of the above areas.

Education

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Techonology, 1990
M.S.E.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1987
B.S.E.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1985

Professional History

2002-present: Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas
1998 - 2002: Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
1998: Principal Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1995 - 1998: Principal Investigator, Simulation Productivity R & D, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1994 - 1996: Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle
1994 - 1995: Corporate Staff Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1993 - 1994: Project Leader of Model Development, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1990 - 1993: Senior Modeling Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon
1989: Component Modeling Engineer, Analogy, Beaverton, Oregon


William (Lin) Oliver III, Associate Professor of Physics

Dr. William Oliver III

Department of Physics
216 Physics Building
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701


Email: woliver@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-6571

Fax: (479)575-4580

 

Adriana Potra, Assistant Professor of Geosciences

Dr. Adriana Potra

Department of Geosciences
22 Ozark Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: potra@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-6419

Fax: (479)575-3469

Dr. Potra specializes in economic ore geology and radiogenic isotope geochemistry. My research interests focus mainly on constraining the origin of metals in ore deposits and on large-scale tectonic reconstructions using radiogenic isotope methods (Pb, Sr, and Nd). My research emphasizes isotopic studies of strategic mineral deposits and enhances understanding of their geochemistry and tectonic framework. My PhD research examined the Guerrero composite terrane of west-central Mexico, a region with a variety of world-class mineral deposits that produce numerous economically important metals such as silver, gold, lead, zinc, copper, and iron. From a tectonic standpoint, the region is interesting because there is debate regarding the paleogeographic evolution of the Guerrero terrane. Strontium, Pb and Nd radionuclides are powerful isotopic tracers that enable a better understanding of the tectonic history of this region and evaluation of the possible sources of its crustal rocks.

Education

Ph.D. Florida International University, 2011
M.S. Babes-Bolyai University, 2001
B.S. Babes-Bolyai University, 1999



Larry Roe, Associate professor of Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Larry Roe

Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences
F50 Stone House North
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: lar@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-3750

Fax: (479)575-3750

Dr. Roe is Center Director and an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He has specific interest in propulsion, planetary surface processes, laboratory simulations, and associated instrumentation. He is a founding co-I of the Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, served as Chairman of the Deployment Subcommittee of the AIAA Working Group on Gossamer and Inflatable Structures for Space Applications, and served as an Associate Editor of Gossamer Spacecraft: Membrane and Inflatable Structures Technology for Space Applications. He has received Summer Faculty Fellowships to work four summers with the Advanced Propulsion Division of Wright Labs, and two summers with the Advanced Propulsion Group of JPL.  He did the conceptual design of the reaction-based inflation system for the 25-meter-diameter antenna for the proposed ARISE radio astronomy spacecraft and the Touch-and-Go sampler for the proposed Hera asteroid sample return mission.  Dr. Roe mentors and teaches graduate-level courses to students in the program. 

Education

Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida, 1987
M.S., Engineering Science, University of Mississippi, 1976
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, University of Mississippi, 1971

Professional History

2015 - present: Director, Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences
2000 - present: Associate Professor, University of Arkansas
1994 - 2000: Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas
1987 - 1994: Assistant Professor, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
1984 - 1985: Contract Engineer, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, W. Palm Beach, FL
1976 - 1980: Senior Analytical Engineer, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, W. Palm Beach, FL
1971 - 1973: Associate Engineer, Westinghouse Research Labs, Pittsburgh, PA


Jason Tullis, Associate Professor of Geography

Dr. Jason A. Tullis
Department of Geosciences
113 Ozark Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Email: jatullis@uark.edu

Phone: (479)575-4770

Fax: (479)575-3649

Dr. Jason A. Tullis is an Assistant Professor of Geography specializing in remote sensing and GIScience at University of Arkansas; he is a member of the Department of Geosciences and is affiliated with the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST); his research interests focus on remote sensing-assisted decision support in North and Central American biogeography and functional landscape health; Dr. Tullis’ research addresses three overlapping areas within this domain, including 1) management of spatial scale, 2) integration of multi-source remote sensor, in situ, and ancillary data, and 3) forest biophysical remote sensing.

Education

Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 2003
M.S., University of South Carolina, 2001
B.S., Brigham Young University, 1999

Professional History

2004 - present: Assistant Professor, Geosciences, Univ. of Arkansas
2001 - 2004: NASA ARC Program Manager, Geography, Univ. of South Carolina
1999 - 2003: RA, TA, and Instructor, Geography, Univ. of South Carolina